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You don't need a body
Come join us in the wired
Reviewed 1998
SERIAL EXPERIMENTS LAIN is at the top of my anime personal favorites list. It's beautiful to watch, smart, thought provoking, and has wonderful character designs and music. I've watched and rewatched my subtitled tapes of this series.. and each time I see something different. The series focuses on one Iwakura Lain, a 15 year old Junior High School Girl and her discovery of an alternative reality... "the wired." The series is not all that hard to figure out despite what some people have been saying. In essence it's a story about the human spirit and technology. The riveting tale strikes home because we can ALL see ourselves living "in the wired." After all... here we are, exchanging thoughts and developing friendships by way of the internet. What could be stranger than that?

The great success of Serial Experiments Lain is that it not only entertains, but challenges us to think, to meditate upon our existence in the digital world we are presently building. The series invites us to ponder the consequences of our running headlong into the future with wild abandon.

Sometimes I feel like Lain... staring into my computer monitor, writing e-mails to people I've never seen or heard. Browsing through endless Web sites and taking apart my computer to make it more efficient. The character Lain is an introvert and an outsider who "finds" herself when she discovers technology. In essence that describes me... and I know it also describes many of those who are reading these words.

you don't need a body
come join us in the wired
Serial Experiments Lain is a must see. While other anime have tackled the issues of alienation and technology ("Ghost in the Shell" "Perfect Blue"), Lain almost makes it seem as if no other anime had confronted the issue before. Not only is this anime introspective... but it is an absolute joy to watch from an artistic standpoint. Tension and angst come across in this series, all due to the wonderfully inventive ways of visually expressing uneasiness that the animation staff of Lain worked hard on creating. Modern Hollywood Directors could learn a thing or two from watching Lain.

The soundtrack to Lain is unforgetable The opening song performed by "BoA" is the very sound of a wondering soul lost in the modern landscape. "I am falling, I am fading, I am drowning, Help me to breathe, I am hurting, I have lost it all, I am losing, Help me to breathe." It is a pop tune but lilting and slightly downcast.

wired weird

Lonely but somehow hopeful. Perfect. The aching theme music plays over one of the most intriguing opening visuals I've yet seen. Lain walking through the city... steel, glass, neon, and the ever present telephone wires dangling overhead. The city crows flock on street signs and watch Lain as she makes her way through the canyons of commerce. Strangers from all over the city interact with their electronic gadjets...
each machine displaying the angst ridden face of young Lain.

I feel accelerated

A crow dives from the sky and comes so close that its beating wings blow the cap off of Lain's head, the scene freezes with the bird's shadow arcoss Lain's face. Serial Experiments Lain is a haunting series that is meant for the serious minded. It is a wonderful statement on our disturbingly numb modernity. If you enjoy speculative science fiction with a touch of social criticism, then it just doesn't get any better than this!

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